Crime Scene Investigation Technology - CS33

Offered at the Following Campuses

  • Valdosta Campus
  • Ben Hill-Irwin Campus

Program Overview

The Crime Scene Investigation Technology associate of applied science degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for work in the forensic laboratories of the modern criminal justice system. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice and Forensic Laboratory theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Crime Scene Investigation Technology associate of applied science degree. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the laboratory facilities attached to any modern investigative facility, civil or private.

Entrance Requirements

*Submit a completed application and application fee;      

*Be at least 18 years of age;   

*Submit official high school transcript or GED transcript;  

*Submit official college transcripts, if applicable;      

*Present acceptable SAT or ACT scores taken within the last 60 months, or acceptable COMPASS or ASSET scores taken within the last 60 months. Documentation on a college transcript of successful completion of appropriate courses from a regionally accredited college or university may be accepted in lieu of test scores.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

*A satisfactory criminal background check must be completed prior to entering the Criminal Justice program.  A felony conviction could prevent employment in the Criminal Justice field.

Course Overview

Credit Hours
General Education Core (15 hours)
Area I - Language Arts/Communication (3 hours)

Prereqs: (ENGL 0098 or Test Score) AND (READ 0098 or Test Score)

Coreqs: None

Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (3 hours)
XXX
xxx
Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective
3
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics (Choose One of the Following) (3 hours)

Prereqs: Placement Test Score or MATH 0090 AND Program Admission

Coreqs: None

Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3

Prereqs: Degree Level Math Scores

Coreqs: None

Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3

Prereqs: Degree Level Math Scores

Coreqs: None

Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (3 hours)
XXX
xxx
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective
3
Additional General Education Core Requirement (3 hours)
XXX
xxx
General Education Core Elective
3
Occupational Courses (51 hours)

Prereqs: None

Coreqs: Provisional Admission

Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.

Prereqs: Provisional Admission

Coreqs: None

Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Topics include: history and philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

This course presents the fundamentals of criminal investigation. The duties and responsibilities of the investigator both in field and in the courtroom are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on techniques commonly utilized by investigative personnel as well as the procedures used for investigating various crimes.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

This course presents students with practical exercises dealing with investigating crime scenes and gathering various forms of physical evidence. Emphasis is placed on crime scene assessment, search, fingerprinting, and evidence collection. Topics include: crime scene management, evidence characteristics, identification, documentation and collection as well as techniques for developing and lifting latent

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

The origin, history and role of forensic science in the investigative process. Philosophical, rational and practical framework that supports a case investigation will be outlined. The unifying principles of forensic science, the rooting of forensic science in the pure sciences, and the unique ways in which a forensic scientist must think will also be discussed. The special areas of forensic science will be explored.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

This course provides an exploration ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan.
CRJU
2050
3

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

Introduces the substantive law of major crimes against persons and property. Attention is given to observation of courtroom trials. Topics include: laws of arrest and search and seizure; procedures governing arrest, trial, and administration of criminal sanctions; rules of evidence; general court procedures; rights and duties of officers and citizens; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to Law Enforcement/Overview of Constitutional Law.
8CF3 - Computer Forensics (27 hours)
XXX
xxx
Social Sciences/Behavioral Sciences Elective
3
CIST
1001
4

Prereqs: None

Coreqs: None

Provides an overview of information systems, computers and technology. Topics include: Information Systems and Technology Terminology, Computer History, Data Representation, Data Storage Concepts, Fundamentals of Information Processing, Fundamentals of Information Security, Information Technology Ethics, Fundamentals of Hardware Operation, Fundamentals of Networking, Fundamentals of the Internet, Fundamentals of Software Design Concepts, Fundamentals of Software, (System and Application), System Development Methodology, Computer Number Systems conversion (Binary and Hexadecimal), Mobile computing.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

This course serves to provide students with the knowledge of the fundamentals of computer technology, networking, and security along with the skills required to identify hardware, peripheral, networking, and security components with an introduction to the fundamentals of installing and maintaining computers. Students will develop the skills to identify the basic functionality of the operating system, perform basic troubleshooting techniques, utilize proper safety procedures, and effectively interact with customers and peers. This course is designed to help prepare students for the CompTIA A+ certification examination.

Prereqs: None

Coreqs: None

Provides an overview of modern operating systems and their use in home and small business environments. Activities will utilize the graphical user interface (GUI) and command line environment (CLI This will include operating system fundamentals; installing, configuring, and upgrading operating systems; managing storage, file systems, hardware and system resources; troubleshooting, diagnostics, and maintenance of operating systems; and networking.

Prereqs: Program Admission

Coreqs: None

Introduces networking technologies and prepares students to take the CompTIA's broad-based, vendor independent networking certification exam, Network +. This course covers a wide range of material about networking, including local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, transmission media, and security. Focuses on operating network management systems, and implementing the installation of networks. It reviews cabling, connection schemes, the fundamentals of the LAN and WAN technologies, TCP/IP configuration and troubleshooting, remote connectivity, and network maintenance and troubleshooting. Topics include: basic knowledge of networking technology, network media and topologies, network devices, network management, network tools and network security.

Prereqs: None

Coreqs: None

This course provides a broad overview of information security. It covers terminology, history, security systems development and implementation. Student will also cover the legal, ethical, and professional issues in information security.

Prereqs: None

Coreqs: None

This course provides knowledge and experience to develop and maintain security policies and procedures. Students will explore the legal and ethical issues in information security and the various security layers: physical security, personnel security, operating systems, network, software, communication and database security. Students will develop an Information Security Policy and an Acceptable Use Policy.

Prereqs: CIST 1122, CIST 1130, CIST 1180

Coreqs: None

Provides a study of computer forensic techniques that will teach the techniques needed to harvest, identify, and analyze data while maintaining the legal and ethical standards needed to produce evidence that is admissible in court. Topics include: Computer Forensics, Ethical practices, Sterile Media, Computer Forensic Tools, Evidence Collection, Evidence Analysis, and Documentation.

 

Crime Scene Investigation

Related Program Options:

Criminal Justice Technology Degree
Criminal Justice Technology Diploma
Criminal Justice Specialist TCC

General Education Core Options

Advisors

Dr. Lisa Williams
Criminal Justice Program Coordinator
Office: Berrien Hall, Room 403
Phone: (229) 333-2100 ext. 3085
Email:
Campus: Valdosta Campus

Mark Pack
Criminal Justice Instructor
Office: Berrien Hall, Room 404
Phone: (229) 259-5557 ext. 3091
Email:
Campus: Valdosta Campus

Bryan McRee
Criminal Justice Instructor
Office: 212A
Phone: (229) 468-2021
Email:
Campus: Ben Hill-Irwin Campus